A Reply To Fans Of The Hollis Family Books

Michele would like to thank all the fans of the Hollis Family books, particularly L. Tilly and C Sykes. They very kindly wrote reviews on Amazon of Cuckoo In The Nest, A Spoonful Of Jam and Impossible!

Here is her message to them:

“Dear L.Tilley and C.Sykes,

I am delighted that you both love the Hollis Family books (Cuckoo in the Nest, A Spoonful of Jam and Impossible!)
The Henry that Elsie marries is the main character in another of my books: Just Henry.
I hope you enjoy that book too.”

Michelle

Here are some of the comments and reviews: (more…)

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New Book Jackets

new book jacket for Magorian's Cuckoo In The NesToday Egmont Publishing rebrands A Spoonful Of Jam and Cuckoo In The Nest with brand new book jackets.

They retail in paperback for £7.99 each and new covers for Just Henry and A Little Love Song will be released on the 7th May.

 

 

 

‘The novels are standalone stories but there is chronological progression and often subtle links between subsidiary characters, so we wanted them to look collectable as well as beautiful”
Egmont Publishing

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Living Together Again
Original Jacket by Anthony Kerins

Living Together Again

Living Together Again

Cuckoo In the Nest and A Spoonful of Jam

 (Written at the request of members of Book Clubs.)

May 2013

Original Cover of Cuckoo In The Nest By Michelle Magorian Illustrated by Anthony Kerins
Original Jacket by Anthony Kerins

It was while I was carrying out research for my second novel Back Home that I became aware of the problems facing families who had to adjust to living together after having been separated during the Second World War.

(Penguin Customer Service Number for Back Home is 0870 607 7600) Back Home tells the story of a girl returning to England from America after five years. Like many shocked, disorientated and lonely sea-evacuees she is faced with bombed streets, rationing, having to live with relatives who are strangers and being expected to behave like an English girl.

After its publication a theatre director approached me and told me that evacuees in England also had difficulties living with their families again. He had been sent to Devon where he had lived for years with two elderly unmarried sisters. He had loved his time there and had planned to be a farmer.

His father, however, on returning from serving overseas, insisted that he come home and begin an apprenticeship. He was bitterly unhappy. What helped him cope was his evening work at two Variety theatres.

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